Film is a time capsule by Kristen McPeek

After one year I finally developed a roll of film from my Minolta 7000 film camera. The film had photos from a weekend trip to Las Vegas last year, my horses at home, and some scenes from downtown Boise. Getting film developed is like Christmas, because you never know what you’re going to get, but you know it will be good!

I highly recommend to anyone who is looking for some creativity without pressure to get a film camera. It’s fun because you aren’t critiquing your work with the instant preview in the playback, and you learn to accept the imperfections when the film is finally processed. Plus the photos has sentiment and value because there is only about 30 pictures you can take.

I don’t think anyone needs an expensive polaroid, or a vintage camera from an antique store, a disposable camera is just as great and still has the soft film look. I develop my film at Idaho Camera in Boise and it is typically done in a day or two. One of the down-sides to shooting film is that it does cost to buy the camera and process the film, but it’s a fun creative process that I believe is well worth it.

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Portraits of Melissa by Kristen McPeek

Melissa was my friend in high school. We walked in graduation together. We took hundreds of photos on different excursions around north Idaho together. Melissa moved to S. Carolina and I happened to visit on a business trip. It’s funny how no matter where we end up, or how big the earth is, we still run into those who have connections to.

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Spaces of Charleston, South Carolina by Kristen McPeek

Growing up in Idaho I joke about how our most historical buildings are crumbled cabins in the middle of the forest, but it’s actually partially true. Yes in Boise we have the marble capital building or faded brick downtown shops, but nothing compares to the history and architecture of the South. I found myself stopping an taking pictures everywhere we went of the old homes and mansions painted in pastel and laced with the flor de liz in iron balconies. So, I present some of my favorite spaces of Charleston, South Carolina.

The American Theater on King Street. Fun Fact: A scene of The Notebook was filmed in front of here.

The American Theater on King Street. Fun Fact: A scene of The Notebook was filmed in front of here.

Double in-camera exposure of a palm tree on Rainbow Row. If I could summarize Charleston in one photo, this would be it.

Double in-camera exposure of a palm tree on Rainbow Row. If I could summarize Charleston in one photo, this would be it.

The tourist must: Rainbow Row

The tourist must: Rainbow Row

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Near ‘The Battery’ which is now a park, but this area was utilized in both the Revolutionary and Civil War as a harbor and weapon storage.

Near ‘The Battery’ which is now a park, but this area was utilized in both the Revolutionary and Civil War as a harbor and weapon storage.

Gibbes Museum of Art. As this photo was taken, I beat the rush of staff bringing in chairs as they set up for a wedding reception in this room. I have one thought for this: #Goals. Multiple told me that Charleston is one of the top wedding destinations in the U.S. and I can see why. It’s classic, elegant, and sentimentally filled with history and a story that people want to be a part of.

Gibbes Museum of Art. As this photo was taken, I beat the rush of staff bringing in chairs as they set up for a wedding reception in this room. I have one thought for this: #Goals. Multiple told me that Charleston is one of the top wedding destinations in the U.S. and I can see why. It’s classic, elegant, and sentimentally filled with history and a story that people want to be a part of.

Another fun fact I was told about Charleston was that buildings weren’t aloud to be taller than the chapels. So yes, there was no sky scrapers, but rather a maze of endless discovery.

Another fun fact I was told about Charleston was that buildings weren’t aloud to be taller than the chapels. So yes, there was no sky scrapers, but rather a maze of endless discovery.

Dock Street Theater: The first building in America built exclusively to be used for theatrical performances. It’s located on… Dock Street.

Dock Street Theater: The first building in America built exclusively to be used for theatrical performances. It’s located on… Dock Street.

Looking down streets of Charleston, this was a common scene.

Looking down streets of Charleston, this was a common scene.

A graveyard sits outside of St Philips Church. You can see Vice President Calhoun was buried here.

A graveyard sits outside of St Philips Church. You can see Vice President Calhoun was buried here.

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Roots of Photography by Kristen McPeek

I believe the root of photography is documentation. If that statement is true, you could say I’ve been documenting all my life. In high school my best friend Maddie and I would take my camera and her infinite closet of clothes and take pictures of each other. It was always a silly thing to do, but I decided to take it professional. When I did, I found that I wasn’t fulfilled with the creativity of capturing photos as I though it would. I felt that there was a sense of civic duty that journalism offered that fashion photography didn’t have. However, I still like to escape to my high school memories and create photos or as I would say, document, our time together. Maddie and I returned to her grandma’s housethis winter and did what we loved to do best. Create.

In this house I am really inspired by the wallpaper, so I decided to use that as the backdrop in most of the photos.

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Hashtag Done by Kristen McPeek

Photo courtesy Patrick Sweeney, Boise State University

Photo courtesy Patrick Sweeney, Boise State University

I did it! I finished college!

It took me until my final semester to actually get straight A’s. But hey I accomplished something I never thought I would ever do.

I have a degree in communications with a journalism emphasis and a political communication minor.

It was never easy. I worked full-time through my whole college career, whether it was two part-time jobs, one full-time job and even achieved some freelancing photography on the side.

Here are some things I learned during that time:

1) When you’re feeling stressed that nothing will get done, just know, as long as you try your best, it will.

2) Pull the “I’m a student” card. Always reach out to people asking to learn more and use being a student to your advantage because once you graduate, you won’t be able to do that again. It works great for networking and making connections before you even finish.

3) Read books by people in your field and people you admire. During your summer and winter breaks, pick up a book. It keeps your mind active and they’re filled with helpful and inspiration knowledge.

4) Settle for more. Always look for opportunities, but never short yourself because, “it’s not the right time” or “I’m not qualified enough.”

5) Be involved. In school I was always sad I could never join clubs or be involved as much as I could because I was always working. One semester in particular, I had some free time and joined some clubs. Through this, I created life-long friends and knowledge. And sometimes clubs will pay for you to go on trips… so I took on Washington DC!

6) Work in your field. If you’re studying to be a fitness trainer, work at the front desk of a gym. If you’re studying history, work at a museum. You’re resume will thank you later.

7) Find your study habits that work for you and stick to them. Realize that not everyone works the same.

And if you want to see even more about working and going to college, click HERE.